Catch Word #109 – The proof is in the pudding

Has your English improved lately? The proof is in the pudding! In this episode, we’re talking about having (or not having) evidence to believe something is true. We look at expressions that can be used to talk about having proof to judge all kinds of things. Is Maura really an alien? You’ll have to see it to believe it. Listen and learn from this episode.

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Expressions from this episode included in the Learning Materials:pudding

  • The proof is in the pudding
  • Till
  • To set
  • To have nothing to do with something
  • To have to see it to believe it
  • Nice one
  • ’Bout Macaroni and cheese
  • Don’t jump to conclusions
  • To be garbage

Sample transcript:

Maura: Our first expression today is…

Harp: The proof is in the pudding. Maura: Mmhm. The proof is in the pudding.

Harp: Yes. The proof is in the pudding.

Maura: Now, this expression means that too fully test something, to see if it’s good or not, you have to experience it yourself. And it can’t be judged when it’s in the process of being completed; you have to wait till something is finished and you can judge whether it’s good or not in the end only.

Harp: Yes. And if you think about it, the proof is in the pudding, pudding is a dessert. It’s a creamy substance, and when you make it, it’s liquid, so you have to wait for it to set, so you have to wait until the ending before you know if it’s good or not.

Maura: Right. You can’t just make pudding and then one minute later, start eating it, because it’s not ready. You have to make the pudding, let it set, and then the real way to tell if it’s good or not is not by looking at it, it’s by eating it.

Harp: Yeah. So the proof is in the pudding means that you have to wait for the end result before you can judge something.

Maura: Right. The proof of whether or not it’s good is at the end, when you can eat the pudding.

Harp: Exactly.

Maura: And actually the original expression is the proof of the pudding is in the eating. So it’s exactly what we said, that you have to eat the pudding, experience it yourself, to know if it’s good or not. But over time, this expression has gotten shorter and it changed around a little bit. Now we simply say the proof is in the pudding.

Harp: Yes. The proof is in the pudding.

Maura: So, you can’t judge something if it’s just in the process of being completed. You have to wait until the end, wait until it’s finished, and then you can experience it and see if it’s good or not. Or in the case of food, you can eat it.

Harp: Yeah. So you have to wait for the results. OK, I think we should give an example with the proof is in the pudding.

Maura: Yes, let’s do it. And even though this expression is about food and dessert and I’m feeling hungry, the example we’re going to do isn’t about food.


Podcast/ Learning Materials: Culips English Podcast

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Posted in Catch Word.