Andrew’s band trip: Part 1

andrewpart1
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Have you ever wanted to play in a band? Or maybe you’ve wondered what life is like for a touring musician? In this episode, you can learn all about it! Join Harp as she interviews Andrew about his experience playing in a band and touring across Canada.

sample dialog

Harp: OK. So you had it all set up, each of the places you were gonna stop and play before you left Montreal.
Andrew: That’s right. I think we had about 20 stops total, all the way across the country.
Harp: Wow! Twenty stops! That’s a lot!
Andrew: Yeah. So we were on the road for just over a month.

Expressions from this episode included in the Learning Materials:

I was like Kind of
To pool things together You know?
A cold call To hound someone
A gig Handy
A roadie If I remember correctly
The Canadian Shield A cover song
To chill out A know-it-all
Swag Second-hand embarrassment
To be blown away by something To give a shout-out to someone

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To know the ropes

know the ropes
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Do you know your stuff? If not, you’re going to want to listen to this episode! Today’s program is all about experts and how to describe them. Join Harp and Andrew as they share many useful expressions that will come in handy when talking about skilled and smart people!

sample dialog

Andrew: And if you know something from back to front, that means you have a very detailed and complete understanding of that thing.
Harp: Yes. You know something really well.
Andrew: So to me, when I think of this expression, I think of reading a book. And I just read the book all the way though and so when I finish the last page, I’m at the back, and that means that I now know this book from the back of the book to the front. I know the whole thing.
Harp: Yes. Exactly. That’s a very good image to think about for this expression.

Expressions from this episode included in the Learning Materials:

An oldie but a goodie To come in handy
Bibimbap To know something inside out
To give someone a hand A heads-up
To know the ropes To be on its last legs
To know your stuff Whoa
To know something from back to front Forest Gump
To chill out A know-it-all
The Simpsons To hook someone up (with something)
Seinfeld To give someone a ring

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Bilingualism in Canada

Bilingualism
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Have you ever wondered why Canada has two official languages, English and French? This episode is dedicated to explaining this complicated subject. Andrew and Maura chat about the historical reasons that caused Canada to be a bilingual country. They also discuss language education in Canada and what it’s like to be an English speaker in the province of Quebec. Maura also talks about how she met Harp in a French class!

sample dialog

Maura: Another great thing is that because this province wants to protect the French language so much, it’s pretty great that you can take French courses that are subsidized by the government. So you can take French language courses and they’re really inexpensive because the government pays for you. They want you to learn French.
Andrew: That is right. They’re a great deal and I know that we have both taken these classes before. And actually, I think Harp has as well, hasn’t she?
Maura: Yes. Actually, that is where I met Harp. We were taking a French class… probably about, I don’t know, 8 years ago now? And in that class, you have a large number of Anglophones and then you also have people from Latin America. I remember there were a lot of Mexicans. And then you have a few Asians. It was kind of a mixed bag.
Andrew: That’s right. But that is really a great place to get the basics of French down when you first move to Montreal. And I feel like this is sort of a rite of passage for Anglophones when they come to Montreal. They sort of get the lay of the land and get the basic French down in these cheap classes.

Expressions from this episode included in the Learning Materials:

To chat it out To edge someone out
Anglophones and Francophones A mixed bag
To applaud someone for something A pocket of something
A lingua franca To get something down
A rite of passage The lay of the land
Code switching To wrap something up
To scratch the surface

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Have you ever been canned?

You are canned
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For a variety of reasons, people are sometimes asked to leave their jobs. This episode is all about expressions used to talk about people getting fired. Be careful using these with people who have been fired, because it can be a sensitive subject, but you’re sure to hear these expressions in movies and television shows. So give this episode a listen, but not while you’re supposed to be working!

sample dialog

Andrew: In this episode, we’re just going to describe three expressions and, yeah, just give you the rundown about them. So our first expression is to can.
Maura: That’s right. Which is funny, ’cause most people probably think of the word can and don’t think of it as a verb used in this way, but to can can mean to fire.
Andrew: That’s right. So if you’re dismissing somebody from their job or you’re firing somebody from their job, you are canning them.
Maura: Right. And in the same way, if you are the person who was fired or was dismissed, you can say that you got canned or you were canned.

Expressions from this episode included in the Learning Materials:

A tour To fire someone
A rundown To chill
Man A grey area
Red Tape Out of the blue
To have someone’s back To toss around an idea
To screw up A rookie mistake
To let someone go

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Give me a ballpark figure

ballpark
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In some situations you can’t be exact, so you have to estimate a number. There are tons of reasons why this happens, and we talk about some in this episode. And of course, we also share some fun expressions to talk about guessing and estimating. How many people were at the concert last night? How much do you think that gold watch is worth? You may have to give a ballpark figure. Listen to this episode to learn more!

sample dialog

Maura: The first expression today is a ballpark figure.
Andrew: Yup. A ballpark figure.
Maura: Hey, yeah. We say that second word a little bit differently, don’t we? I say a ballpark figure.
Andrew: And I say a ballpark figure
Maura: Yours sounds actually right. It sounds like how it’s spelled. Mine sounds strange.
Andrew: Yeah, well, I think this is interesting because Canadians don’t really have too much variation in their accent, but I am from the West Coast and you’re from Ontario, and sometimes there are some slight vowels that we say differently and this is an example of that. I say figure and you say figure.

Expressions from this episode included in the Learning Materials:

Stoked To pass away
Expressions to use when someone has died The best way to go
Yuppers Full blast
A ballpark figure On the spur of the moment
In the market for something A beater
Happening An educated guess
A margin of error A cut of something
The more you know A stag and doe
To blow money

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